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Slab Casting

Slab Casting is the most common common structural element done during construction of modern buildings. Horizontal slabs of steel reinforced concrete, typically between 4 and 20 inches (100 and 500 millimeters) thick, and are most often used to construct floors and ceilings, while thinner slabs are also used for exterior paving.





Foundation

A foundation is the lower portion of building structure that transfers its load to the ground. Foundations are generally broken into two categories, the first being shallow foundations and the second being deep foundations. A tall building must have a strong foundation if it is to stand for a long time, the foundation of building is the most important factor that determines the life of the building.





Post Construction

The Post production team would identify and resolve potential issues well before doors open. The main reason is to provide with smooth function experience. The objective of the Post-Construction Stage is to maintain building performance throughout the useful life of the facility. The lifespan of the building would be determined with the Post Construction methodology.





Damp Proofing

Damp proofing in construction is a type of moisture control applied to building walls and floors to prevent moisture from passing into the interior spaces. Damp problems are among the most frequent problems encountered in homes. If the damp proofing is not set accurate then the building would result in future cracks and seepage.





Masonary

Masonry is the building of structures from individual units, which are often laid in and bound together by mortar; the term masonry can also refer to the units themselves. The common materials of masonry construction are brick, building stone such as marble, granite, travertine, and limestone, cast stone, concrete block, glass block, and adobe. Masonry is generally a highly durable form of construction. However, the materials used, the quality of the mortar and workmanship, and the pattern in which the units are assembled can substantially affect the durability of the overall masonry construction. A person who constructs masonry is called a mason or bricklayer.





Form Work

Formwork is the term given to either temporary or permanent molds into which concrete or similar materials are poured. Form work is a important function to provide the strength of the concrete.





Color of Cement

The color of the cement determines the basic shade of the concrete. In Portland cement, the color depends on the iron content in the clinker – the higher it is, the darker the gray becomes because of the magnesium in the cement. However, other major components in cement influence the shade of gray. Granulated blast-furnace slag can make the cement brighter. The gray of cement sits between the two extremes of white and black.





Plastering

Plaster is a building material used for the protective and/or decorative coating of walls and ceilings and for moulding and casting decorative elements. Plaster adds the smoothness to the cement work .The most common types of plaster mainly contain either gypsum, lime, or cement, but all work in a similar way. The plaster is manufactured as a dry powder and is mixed with water to form a stiff but workable paste immediately before it is applied to the surface.





Mortar

Mortar is a mixture of sand, cement and water. Mortar is a workable paste used to bind building blocks such as stones, bricks, and concrete masonry units together. Mortar includes pitch, asphalt, and soft mud or clay, such as used between mud bricks. Cement mortar becomes immediately hard when it cures, resulting in a rigid aggregate structure. Mortar is intended to be weaker than the building blocks, because the mortar is easier and less expensive to repair than the building blocks. Mortars are typically made from a mixture of sand, a binder, and water.





Finishing

Finishing of cement is done with the use of Screeds. Screeds often consist of long pieces of metal or wood that are pulled and pushed across the concrete surface to remove excess concrete and fill in gaps in the concrete surface. Immediately after concrete has been placed in forms, concrete finishers utilize a screed to level out the concrete surface. Curing - Curing of cement takes place immediately after the concrete is placed and the finishing of the same is done. Properly cured concrete has an adequate amount of moisture for continued hydration and development of strength, volume stability, resistance to freezing and thawing, and abrasion and scaling resistance.





Curing

Slab Casting is the most common common structural element done during construction of modern buildings. Horizontal slabs of steel reinforced concrete, typically between 4 and 20 inches (100 and 500 millimeters) thick, and are most often used to construct floors and ceilings, while thinner slabs are also used for exterior paving.





Storing Cement

Cement has to be properly stored. Store cement in a building which is dry, leak proof and as moisture proof as possible. The room has to be airtight. When it is required to store cement for a long period of time or during the monsoon, the same should be completely enclose the stack by a water proofing membrane such as polyethylene. Different types of cement must be stacked and stored separately. There should not be more than 15 bags in one pile. This is done to avoid lumping under pressure.